5 Video Games You Should Play Before You Die

5.) Halo 3 (2007)
Why: The Halo series is one of a kind. It brought friends together to blast one another in an epic space combat. Halo 3 is perhaps the best of the series when it came to the glorified multiplayer, with a dramatic storyline with absolutely no shortage of opera music cues and a hardy character customization. Many titles still try and replicate what Halo did and it just can’t be matched.

4.) Minecraft (2011)
Why: Minecraft is one of the best-selling video games of all time, so you would have to be living under a rock as a gamer to have never come across it. You get to create your own world basically and do whatever you want. If you think it, then you can create it. The nice thing about Minecraft is it is offered on almost every platform, including smartphones. This game is good for letting your mind wander and become an artist.

3.) Super Mario 64 (1996)
Why: Mario is one of the most known titles, but anyone can tell you this might be the best game in the franchise. The game is not like any of its predecessors because this was the first 3D platform game in the series. It is a bigger world than the ones before and the additional moves and jumps Mario can do makes the game fast-paced and more exciting. There are a total of 120 stars and the game has a ton of replay value. Mario platformers are still being made today and none of them still cannot come close to how good this game was.

2.) Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998)
Why: Everyone has their favorite Zelda game, but Ocarina of Time encompasses the best features from the glorified series. There is a huge world that you have the freedom to explore, a magnificent score, and a truly remarkable origin story. The dungeons are not too challenging, but intricate enough to not get too mad when you can’t figure a puzzle out.

1.) Pokémon X and Y (2013)
Why: Whether you are a kid or an adult, with this franchise that never seemed to matter. Pokémon revolutionized what it meant to make characters like Pikachu come alive. They modernized the handheld multiplayer gaming and made it what it is today. X and Y is one of the newer titles, which is great because the game never stops using the old characters the adults grew up on.

Supply Drop Addiction

Call of Duty makers finally found an answer to a growing problem in the COD franchise. The only revenue a company used to collect from creating a video game was through initial sales of the game itself. Call of Duty games have traditionally been released in November, right before the holidays. Activision and other COD makers would see a huge boost in sales at the end of every year, but that’s it. So how can video game makers keep squeezing money from players during the entire year? The answer: supply drops.

First introduced in Advanced Warfare in 2014, supply drops allowed the gamer to play a lottery to “win” better weapons, cooler camos, and stylish virtual gear. Sledgehammer Games, the creator of AW, put this feature in the game as an added bonus to players who either played the game a lot (and earned ‘keys’ to open supply drops with each match played), or spent actual money on “COD Points”. Each opening of a supply drop yielded three items of various rarity. Players could use their virtual ‘keys’ or COD points to open a common (smaller chance of getting a rare item) or a rare (larger chance of getting a rare item) supply drop. With each opening, players received items to further customize their character or weapon to show off to their friends… and that’s why supply drops were so successful (and honestly, quite brilliant). The video game creators tapped into the competitive and somewhat immature minds of gamers. Players could now circumvent the arduous task of getting 250 headshots to get a rare camo by purchasing more COD points. It took time and skill out of the equation in exchange for money. Thus, cash came pouring in.

Supply drops became so successful that Treyarch and Infinity Ward, the creators of Black Ops III and Infinite Warfare respectively, continued with trend. Call of Duty franchise makers could now continue to earn revenue throughout the life of the game, instead of just when a person buys the game at the store. According to Activision’s Q4 2016 earnings call, the company made an additional $3.6bn through in-game content sales (mostly from COD: Black Ops III and Overwatch). That’s unbelievable!

Some gamers might say that supply drops are ruining the game, however. I happen to agree – especially for the newest CoD game, Infinite Warfare. In Infinite Warfare, weapon variants, or different (and statistically better) versions of guns, make playing public matches much more frustrating. For example, the Erad used to be one of my favorite guns in the game. I played with the common (base) variant, and I was pretty good with it… until I came face-to-face with a player who had the legendary (rarest) variant of the gun – called the ‘cyclopean’. It literally shoots a LASER BEAM instead of regular bullets. I didn’t stand a chance. I was insta-killed time and time again by the same player. I became so frustrated with this one match that I ended up not using my Erad stock variant ever again. I knew that if I wanted a chance of winning gun battles, I needed legendary weapon variants, which are quite difficult to come by without opening supply drops.